Housing and Education Research

Search for research on the intersection of housing and education policy. Read jargon-less summaries of key findings and interesting facts, or read the full PDF and grab the citation for your own writing.


Housing Policy is School Policy

858 elementary school students in Montgomery County, Maryland who lived in public housing from 2001 to 2007.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Schwartz, Heather. Housing Policy Is School Policy: Economically Integrative Housing Promotes Academic Success in Montgomery County, Maryland. Rep. New York: Century Foundation, 2010.


Changing the Geography of Opportunity by Expanding Residential Choice

One 8- to 18-year-old child was randomly selected from 118 families participating in the Gautreaux housing mobility program in 1982, with follow-up in 1989 with a 59.1% response rate.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Rosenbaum, James E. "Changing the Geography of Opportunity by Expanding Residential Choice: Lessons from the Gautreaux Program." Housing Policy Debate 6.1 (1995): 231-69.


Moving to Opportunity for Fair Housing Demonstration Program: Final Impacts Evaluation

From 1994 to 1998, 4,604 public housing households were enrolled in five cities - Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York and assigned to the experimental, section 8 only, or control groups. Final follow-up occurred 10 to 15 years after initial enrollment, where the response rate was 90% for household heads and 89% for youth.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Sanbonmatsu, Lisa, Jens Ludwig, Lawrence F. Katz, Lisa A. Gennetian, Greg J. Duncan, Ronald C. Kessler, Emma Adam, Thomas W. McDade, and Stacy T. Lindau. Moving to Opportunity for Fair Housing Demonstration Program: Final Impacts Evaluation. Rep. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2011.


Does Moving to Better Neighborhoods Lead to Better Schooling Opportunities?

The mothers and children that participated in the Baltimore site of the Moving to Opportunity experiment (recruited from public housing between 1994 and 1998). For the quantitative section, the study uses data from 249 children in 2001. The qualitative section uses a stratified random subsample of 149 families (55 interviews with control-group families and 35 with experimental families that relocated) in July 2003 and June 2004.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Deluca, Stefanie, and Peter Rosenblatt. "Does Moving to Better Neighborhoods Lead to Better Schooling Opportunities? Parental School Choice in an Experimental Housing Voucher Program." Teachers College Record 112.5 (2010): 1443-491.


Why Poor People Move (and Where They Go)

Semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 140 low-income African-American parents earning less than 50% AMI with at least one child under 18 in Baltimore, MD and Mobile, AL in 2010.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Deluca, Stefanie, Peter Rosenblatt, and Holly Wood. Why Poor People Move (and Where They Go): Residential Mobility, Selection and Stratification. Rep. New York: NYU, 2013. DRAFT: PLEASE DO NOT CITE WITHOUT PERMISSION


Public Schools, Public Housing

The public housing data consists of 286 non-senior public housing developments with 169,105 units in the New York City Housing Authority in 2008. School data consists of 736,274 public elementary and middle school students in 2002-03, 84,526 of whom were matched to a non-senior NYCHA development.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Schwartz, Amy E., Brian J. McCabe, Ingrid G. Ellen, and Colin C. Chellman. "Public Schools, Public Housing: The Education of Children Living in Public Housing." Urban Affairs Review 46.1 (2010): 68-89.


Do Federally Assisted Households Have Access to High Performing Public Schools?

Datasets used include national data on subsidized housing tenants in 2008, Low Income Housing Tax Credit data up to 2009, Department of Education proficiency scores in Math and English for all public school students, and the Common Core of Data (public schools), presumably from the 2008-09 school year. This study focuses on elementary schools.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Ellen, Ingrid G., and Keren M. Horn. Do Federally Assisted Households Have Access to High Performing Public Schools? Rep. Washington, D.C.: PRRAC, 2012.


Welcome to the Neighborhood?

Youth ages 8 to 18 (1 to 11 at relocation) in 189 families in public housing or on the waiting list in Yonkers, NY randomly selected to new "dispersed" public housing in middle-income neighborhoods between 1992 and 1994. These "movers" were compared to 145 comparable families eligible to move but who did not (the authors did not have access to the waiting list - only half had actually entered the lottery), with interviews 2 (315 Black and Latino families) and 7 (247 of these families) years after relocation. In both groups, a total of 221 youth were interviewed at the 7 year follow up (a 22% loss between the interviews).

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Fauth, Rebecca C., Tama Leventhal, and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "Welcome to the Neighborhood? Long-Term Impacts of Moving to Low-Poverty Neighborhoods on Poor Children's and Adolescents' Outcomes." Journal of Research on Adolescence 17.2 (2007): 249-84.


The Impact of School Choice on Student Outcomes

Follows three groups of 9th graders in Chicago Public Schools in the fall of 1993, 1994, and 1995, for a total of 76,563 students. Because of missing 8th grade test scores, missing subsequent outcomes, and other missing data, the final total is 60,623.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Cullen, Julie Berry, Brian A. Jacob, and Steven D. Levitt. "The Impact of School Choice on Student Outcomes: An Analysis of the Chicago Public Schools." Journal of Public Economics 89.5-6 (2005): 729-60.


Opening Doors: How Low-Income Parents Search for the Right School

Targeted telephone interviews of 800 low-income parents that had recently picked a school for their child in Washington, D.C., Milwaukee, and Denver in late fall of 2005.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Teske, Paul, Jody Fitzpatrick, and Gabriel Kaplan. Opening Doors: How Low-Income Parents Search for the Right School. Rep. Seattle, WA: Center on Reinventing Public Education, 2007.


All Choices Created Equal?

Three interviews of 48 parents of children before and after they began attending sixth or ninth grade from January to November, 2003. The metro area is presented as a typical metro in the Midwest with abundant school choice, though the author does not name it due to confidentiality concerns. Potential participants were purposely sampled from failing and non-failing schools of different school types (public, public charter, etc.). Using lists of fifth and eighth grade students, participants were randomly selected from three income categories and contacted by telephone. The positive response rate was 60%, and parents with similar characteristics replaced parents that declined.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Bell, Courtney A. "All Choices Created Equal? The Role of Choice Sets in the Selection of Schools." Peabody Journal of Education 84.2 (2009): 191-208.


Parental Preferences and School Competition

Parents in Charlotte-MecklenBurg School District (CMS), North Carolina, in 2002, after school choice was implemented. Parents submitted the top three choices for schools for their children - about 95% (105,000 of 110,000 students) of children submitted choices. This study narrows that population to parents of students entering grades 4 through 8. In addition, CMS drew new school boundaries, forcing about half of parents to be assigned to a new school (43% elementary, 52% middle and 35% high school), allowing the researchers to differentiate a desire for proximity to the school from other, unobservable, neighborhood characteristics.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Hastings, Justine S., Thomas J. Kane, and Douglas O. Staiger. Parental Preferences and School Competition: Evidence From a Public School Choice Program. Working paper no. 11805. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 2005.


Information, School Choice, and Academic Achievement

Parents of children in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public School District (CMS) in NCLB-sanctioned schools (16 schools with 6,695 students) who had already made school choice selections, were re-sent choice forms with a simplified 3-page listing of schools with test scores in the summer of 2004. Additionally, parents at NCLB and non-NCLB schools in CMS in 2006 were sent a one-page sheet of schools, with either test scores or odds of admission (randomized) as part of the school choice process — non-NCLB schools were randomly selected, while NCLB schools were required to send out information to all students. This second experiment included 6,328 non-NCLB students and 10,134 NCLB students.

Key Findings

Interesting Facts

Citation

Hastings, Justine S., and Jeffrey M. Weinstein. Information, School Choice, and Academic Achievement: Evidence from Two Experiments. Working paper no. 13623. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 2007.